The Structuring of Debate: Notes on Higher Education

An excellent post by @KeithHampson – eludes to some of the reasons #HigherEd might be perceived as somewhat dysfunctional from a cost basis. However, leaves out other influences (banks, politicians, etc.) that have a profound affect. Also, how ’bout the students … with greater access to technology they too have a voice and are weighing in.

Higher Education Management

“Academic politics is the most vicious and bitter form of politics, because the stakes are so low.”

The idea at the core of this quote has been rehashed so often and by so many public figures that it’s now difficult to be certain of its origins (Woodrow Wilson?). But the relevance and longevity of the quote likely owes less to the actual insignificance of the debates in higher education, than its unrestrained quality. We have a tendency in higher education to not hold back.

There is no end to the topics worth debating: rising costs in higher education (and who’s to blame), identity politics, the “adjunctification” of academic labor, and rising calls for accountability, to name but a few. The role of educational technology is now a frequent focus.

There’s more of it, too. The Internet has dramatically increased the number of venues to facilitate debate. And just as importantly…

View original post 493 more words

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: